Bronteana: Bronte Studies Blog Archives

May 10, 2006

114727491699163528

Filed under: Uncategorized — by bronteana @ 11:10 am

Ma boite! Ma boite!

My copy of Jane Eyre 1973 has finally arrived- and much sooner than anticipated! Maybe the company is aware of how much business I send their way. 😉 I have not looked at the programme yet, but I have the full back cover synopsis for you all:

Faithfulness to the novel and a perfect cast make this BBC adaptation the ONE

AFTER A CHILDHOOD THAT WOULD HAVE BROKEN WEAKER GIRLS, Jane Eyre finds a respectable position as governess to the ward of the enigmatic Mr. Rochester. Twenty years her senior, brusque, and hardened by loss, Mr. Rochester finds his spirited new employee strangely bewitching. Despite the social chasm that divides them, they are drawn to each other as equals and contemplate true happiness at last. But there is an impediment to their love that tests Jane’s integrity and strength almost beyond endurance.
Considered by many to be the best adaptation of Charlotte Bronte’s romantic classics, this BBC miniseries is true to the original story, with dialogue taken directly from the novel. Best of all is the perfect casting and chemistry of the unlikely lovers, with Sorcha Cusack (Casualty) as Jane and Michael Jayston (Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy) as Mr. Rochester.

DVD Special Features Include bio of Charlotte Brontë and cast filmographies.
Approx. 248 min. 4:3 full screen
color British Drama

Due to the age of these programs and the improved resolution that DVD provides, you may notice occasional flaws in the image and audio on this DVD presentation that were beyond our our ability to correct from the original materials.

Thisbeciel, who has already seen her copy, notes that the biography of Charlotte was taken from the Brontë Parsonage Website (hopefully credited!)

This is the US edition. The UK edition may also include a picture gallery. The US edition may be ordered from Acorn Media, the UK edition is available for preorders from the BBC as well as Play.com, sendit.com, and Choices Direct.

Additional note: Some readers may have noticed changes to the index on the sidebar. I am still working on completing organisation of the archives but this is taking a long time. Please be patient in the meantime.

Advertisements

2 Comments »

  1. “Due to the age of these programs and the improved resolution that DVD provides, you may notice occasional flaws in the image and audio on this DVD presentation that were beyond our our ability to correct from the original materials.”

    They might be referring to a moment during a conversation between Jane and Edward when you can distinctly hear a telephone ring in the background! I think it might be during the “explanation” scene the day after the proposal under the oak tree. I’m watching the dvds in stages at the moment, and I haven’t gotten there yet. In fact, I’d watched this series dozens of times and never noticed that little flaw, but someone I’d made a copy of the old tape for caught it. It just goes to show, this wasn’t intended to be “one for the ages” – it was just a workmanlike production of one of the classics of English lit., such as the BBC was regularly turning out in the 70s. But the genius casting, acting and script turned it into a gem.

    Comment by Dr. Mabuse — May 12, 2006 @ 8:26 am |Reply

  2. I’ll have to take a look now. I didn’t notice it either. I was trying to hear for any audio problems but didn’t catch any so you could be right 🙂

    I heard once that the BBC tried to film their programs in one take if possible. I think Brocklehurst almost misses his line towards the end of his first scene. Filming the production in a history property rather than in the studio also gave it a more natural feel.

    Comment by Brontëana — May 12, 2006 @ 4:28 pm |Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: